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22 May 2019 - Wednesday

Man Booker International Prize | Miles Franklin Award longlist
The Governesses review

       Man Booker International Prize

       They've announced that Celestial Bodies, by Jokha Alharthi and translated by Marilyn Booth, has won this year's Man Booker International Prize.
       I haven't even seen this one yet; see the Sandstone Press publicity page, or get your copy at Amazon.com or Amazon.co.uk.

(Posted by: M.A.Orthofer)    - permanent link -



       Miles Franklin Award longlist

       They've announced the longlist for this year's Miles Franklin Literary Award, a leading Australian novel prize.
       The shortlist will be announced 2 July, and the winner on 30 July.

(Posted by: M.A.Orthofer)    - permanent link -



       The Governesses review

       The most recent addition to the complete review is my review of Anne Serre's The Governesses.

       This came out from New Directions in the US and is a finalist for this year's Best Translated Book Award -- and is now also available in a UK edition from Les Fugitives.

(Posted by: M.A.Orthofer)    - permanent link -



21 May 2019 - Tuesday

Nanni Balestrini (1935-2019) | Rathbones Folio Prize
Caine Prize shortlist | Gordon Burn Prize longlist

       Nanni Balestrini (1935-2019)

       Italian author Nanni Balestrini has passed away; see, for example, the Artforum report.
       Several of his works have been translated into English, including We Want Everything; see the Verso publicity page, or get your copy at Amazon.com or Amazon.co.uk.

(Posted by: M.A.Orthofer)    - permanent link -



       Rathbones Folio Prize

       They've announced that The Perseverance, by Raymond Antrobus, has won this year's Rathbones Folio Prize, the £30,000 prize for: "the best work of literature of the year, regardless of form".
       See also the Penned in the Margins publicity page, or get your copy at Amazon.com or Amazon.co.uk.

(Posted by: M.A.Orthofer)    - permanent link -



       Caine Prize shortlist

       They've announced the shortlist for the 2019 Caine Prize for African Writing.
       Two of the stories were originally published in McSweeney's, and one in The Baffler.
       The winner will be announced 8 July.

(Posted by: M.A.Orthofer)    - permanent link -



       Gordon Burn Prize longlist

       They've announced the longlist for this year's Gordon Burn Prize, which: "seeks to reward a published title -- fiction or non-fiction -- which represents the spirit and sensibility of Gordon's literary methods" -- not yet at the official site, last I checked, but see, for example, Benedicte Page's report at The Bookseller.
       None of the longlisted titles are under review at the complete review -- but three of Burn's books are, including The North of England Home Service.
       The shortlist will be announced in July and the winner in October.

(Posted by: M.A.Orthofer)    - permanent link -



20 May 2019 - Monday

Russian Literature Week | The Coming of Joachim Stiller review

       Russian Literature Week

       Read Russia is holding Russian Literature Week in New York, Philadelphia, and Washington D.C. today through the 24th, featuring The Man Who Couldn't Die-author Olga Slavnikova and Zuleika-author Guzel Yakhina.

(Posted by: M.A.Orthofer)    - permanent link -



       The Coming of Joachim Stiller review

       The most recent addition to the complete review is my review of Hubert Lampo's 1960 novel, The Coming of Joachim Stiller, just out in a new translation, by Paul Vincent, from Valancourt Books.

(Posted by: M.A.Orthofer)    - permanent link -



19 May 2019 - Sunday

Top 50 French books since 1900 ? | Bibliotopia

       Top 50 French books since 1900 ?

       I missed this when it first appeared, a couple of weeks ago, but at Le Temps they came up with a list of Les 50 meilleurs livres de langue française de 1900 à aujourd’hui. (This is a Swiss publication, and those who selected the titles all seem to be Swiss (or Switzerland-based); no doubt a panel from France (or other French-speaking countries) would have chosen differently -- maybe not three books by Ramuz ?)
       Most of the top choices aren't that surprising -- well, maybe Alcools at nr.4 ... --, with the most intriguing in the top ten probably being Nicolas Bouvier's The Way of the World (nr. 8, just ahead of Waiting for Godot), a book that was apparently originally self-published.
       Eight of the titles are under review at the complete review:        The list as a whole is an interesting mix, though certainly not quite the order (or titles, in many case ...) I'd go with.

(Posted by: M.A.Orthofer)    - permanent link -



       Bibliotopia

       It's Bibliotopia: A literary week-end around the world at the Jan Michalski Foundation this weekend, with a neat programme.
       Even the disappointing -- "Unfortunately Dubravka Ugrešić had to cancel her visit" -- comes with a silver lining: "She will be replaced by the writer Mikhail Shishkin".

(Posted by: M.A.Orthofer)    - permanent link -



18 May 2019 - Saturday

Herman Wouk (1915-2019) | Aniara, the film
The Deer and the Cauldron review

       Herman Wouk (1915-2019)

       Pulitzer Prize-winning American author Herman Wouk has passed away; see, for example, William Grimes' obituary in The New York Times.

(Posted by: M.A.Orthofer)    - permanent link -



       Aniara, the film

       Nobel laureate Harry Martinson's science fiction poem Aniara has been turned into a movie -- see the official site -- which is now out, to mixed reviews, in the US.
       For some of the reviews, see:
(Posted by: M.A.Orthofer)    - permanent link -



       The Deer and the Cauldron review

       The most recent addition to the complete review is my review of Louis Cha's (i.e. Jin Yong's) The Deer and the Cauldron.
       This is a (good-looking) three-volume set from Oxford University Press, translated by The Story of the Stone-translator-team of John Minford and (un(officially)-credited) David Hawkes, and Rachel May, and it's the longest book (over 1500 pages, over 600,000 words) I've reviewed in a while (as well as the longest review ...) -- though one of my complaints about it is that it's an abridged translation .....
       They recently announced that this would be filmed, by Pang Ho-cheung, in a three-film series, with a decent budget ($80 million per film), the first film to be released in 2021.

       Jin Yong has been getting more attention recently, with the Legends of the Condor Heroes-series coming out in English -- from MacLehose in the UK (see their publicity page) and now finally, this fall, from St.Martin's in the US (see their publicity page); I hope to get to those too.

(Posted by: M.A.Orthofer)    - permanent link -



17 May 2019 - Friday

Dylan Thomas Prize | French Translation Prizes
Encore Award shortlist | Libri irodalmi díjak

       Dylan Thomas Prize

       They've announced that In Our Mad and Furious City, by Guy Gunaratne, has won this year's Swansea University International Dylan Thomas Prize, a £30,000 prize "for the best published literary work in the English language, written by an author aged 39 or under".
       See also the Farrar, Straus and Giroux publicity page, or get your copy at Amazon.com or Amazon.co.uk.

(Posted by: M.A.Orthofer)    - permanent link -



       French Translation Prizes

       They've announced the winners of this year's French-American Foundation Translation Prizes.
       The fiction prize was shared by Linda Coverdale (for her translation of Slave Old Man by Patrick Chamoiseau) and Chris Clarke (for his translation of Imaginary Lives by Marcel Schwob), while the non-fiction prize went to Malcolm Debevoise (for his translation of Good Government by Pierre Rosanvallon).

(Posted by: M.A.Orthofer)    - permanent link -



       Encore Award shortlist

       The Royal Society of Literature has announced the shortlist for the Encore Award -- a second novel prize.
       The winner will be announced 13 June.

(Posted by: M.A.Orthofer)    - permanent link -



       Libri irodalmi díjak

       They've announced that the short story collection Verseim, by Szvoren Edina, is the winner of this year's Libri Literary Prize, a relatively new but significant Hungarian book prize; see also the hlo report.

(Posted by: M.A.Orthofer)    - permanent link -



16 May 2019 - Thursday

Prix mondial Cino Del Duca | BTBA finalists
Tbilisi International Festival of Literature

       Prix mondial Cino Del Duca

       The prix mondial Cino Del Duca isn't strictly an author-prize -- it's for a 'grand humaniste', and scientists are eligible too, for their life-work, with the first award going to Konrad Lorenz (in 1969) -- but it has a pretty impressive literary record too: winners include Ignazio Silone, Alejo Carpentier, Jorge Luis Borges, Ernst Jünger, Ismail Kadare, Milan Kundera, Patrick Modiano, and Sylvie Germain, among others. At €200,000 it is also has one of the biggest payouts of any author-prize (though public recognition, or even awareness, is certainly lagging ...).
       They've now announced this year's laureate -- though not yet at the official site, last I checked -- and it's The Meursault Investigation-author Kamel Daoud, who will receive the prize on 5 June; see, for example, the report at Livres Hebdo.

(Posted by: M.A.Orthofer)    - permanent link -



       BTBA finalists

       They've announced the finalists for (American) Best Translated Books Awards.
       The ten fiction finalists are:
  • Bricks and Mortar by Clemens Meyer, tr. Katy Derbyshire
  • Congo Inc. by In Koli Jean Bofane, tr. Marjolijn de Jager
  • Convenience Store Woman by Murata Sayaka, tr. Ginny Tapley Takemori
  • Fox by Dubravka Ugrešić, tr. Ellen Elias-Bursać and David Williams
  • The Governesses by Anne Serre, tr. Mark Hutchinson
  • The Hospital by Ahmed Bouanani, tr. Lara Vergnaud
  • Moon Brow by Shahriar Mandanipour, tr. Khalili Sara
  • Öræfï by Ófeigur Sigurðsson, tr. Lytton Smith
  • Pretty Things by Virginie Despentes, tr. Emma Ramadan
  • Slave Old Man by Patrick Chamoiseau, tr. Linda Coverdale (Martinique, New Press)
       It's an ... interesting variety .....
       The winners will be announced 29 May.

(Posted by: M.A.Orthofer)    - permanent link -



       Tbilisi International Festival of Literature

       The Tbilisi International Festival of Literature runs tomorrow through the 21st, with an interesting-looking programme.
       See also Ketevan Kvaratskheliya's report in Georgia Today.

(Posted by: M.A.Orthofer)    - permanent link -



15 May 2019 - Wednesday

Sven Lindqvist (1932-2019) | Prix Littérature-Monde finalists
Ockham New Zealand Book Awards
Maigret and the Good People of Montparnasse review

       Sven Lindqvist (1932-2019)

       Swedish author -- mainly of non-fiction --Sven Lindqvist has passed away.
       Quite a few of his works have been translated into English; among his best-known is "Exterminate All the Brutes"; see the publicity pages from The New Press and Granta, or get your copy at Amazon.com or Amazon.co.uk.
       See also his official site.

(Posted by: M.A.Orthofer)    - permanent link -



       Prix Littérature-Monde finalists

       The festival Etonnants Voyageurs (coming 8 to 10 June) has a variety of prizes, including the prix Littérature-Monde -- a world literature prize, awarded in two categories: French and translated -- and they've now announced the five finalists in each category; not yet at the official site, last I checked, but see the report at Livres Hebdo.
       The winner will be announced 20 May.

(Posted by: M.A.Orthofer)    - permanent link -



       Ockham New Zealand Book Awards

       They've announced the winners of this year's Ockham New Zealand Book Awards, with This Mortal Boy, by Fiona Kidman, winning the NZ$53,000 Acorn Foundation Fiction Prize; see also the Penguin Books New Zealand publicity page.
       The Māori Language Award went to He Kupu Tuku Iho, by Tīmoti Kāretu and Wharehuia Milroy; see also the Auckland University Press publicity page.

(Posted by: M.A.Orthofer)    - permanent link -



       Maigret and the Good People of Montparnasse review

       The most recent addition to the complete review is my review of Georges Simenon's Maigret and the Good People of Montparnasse, a new translation in Penguin Classics' ongoing overhaul of the whole series.

(Posted by: M.A.Orthofer)    - permanent link -



14 May 2019 - Tuesday

Arthur Miller Freedom to Write Lecture | RSL Ondaatje Prize

       Arthur Miller Freedom to Write Lecture

       The recent PEN World Voices Festival concluded with Arundhati Roy giving the Arthur Miller Freedom to Write Lecture, and at The Guardian you can now read an abridged version of it, Literature provides shelter. That's why we need it.

       Democracy Now ! also has an interview -- video and transcript --, Arundhati Roy on the Power of Fiction: Literature is “The Simplest Way of Saying a Complicated Thing”.

(Posted by: M.A.Orthofer)    - permanent link -



       RSL Ondaatje Prize

       The Royal Society of Literature has announced that The Wife's Tale, by Aida Edemariam, has won this year's RSL Ondaatje Prize, "awarded for a distinguished work of fiction, non-fiction or poetry, evoking the spirit of a place".
       See also the publicity pages from Harper Perennial and 4th Estate, or get your copy at Amazon.com or Amazon.co.uk.

(Posted by: M.A.Orthofer)    - permanent link -



13 May 2019 - Monday

Translating from ... Portuguese into Arabic | Online literature in ... China
Castle Gripsholm review

       Translating from ... Portuguese into Arabic

       In The Arabic Weekly Mohamed Hemamsi reports on how Translating books from Portuguese into Arabic builds bridges with Brazil, as a recent publication introduced and discussed at the Abu Dhabi International Book Fair: "contains selections from 12 books written by Brazilian authors of Arab origin or influenced by Arabic culture".

(Posted by: M.A.Orthofer)    - permanent link -



       Online literature in ... China

       Xinhua reports that China has 14 mln authors of online literature: report, as:
China's registered authors of online literary works totaled more than 14 million as of 2018, according to the latest report issued by the China Writers Association
       No clear definition of what makes an author 'registered', but that is a lot of writers .....

(Posted by: M.A.Orthofer)    - permanent link -



       Castle Gripsholm review

       The most recent addition to the complete review is my review of Kurt Tucholsky's 1931 novel, Castle Gripsholm.
       This was apparently Michael Hofmann's first translation, published in 1985; New York Review Books has just reïssued it.

(Posted by: M.A.Orthofer)    - permanent link -



12 May 2019 - Sunday

Desmond Elliott Prize shortlist | New Poet Laureate

       Desmond Elliott Prize shortlist

       They've announced the three-title shortlist for this year's Desmond Elliott Prize, "an annual award for a first novel written in English and published in the UK".
       The winning title will be announced 19 June.

(Posted by: M.A.Orthofer)    - permanent link -



       New Poet Laureate

       The British queen has approved: "the appointment of Simon Armitage as the next Poet Laureate for a fixed-term of ten years".
       The position ? honor ? of 'Poet Laureate' is: "awarded to a poet whose work is of national significance"; Armitage is the twenty-first of these, and succeeds Carol Ann Duffy; "The position is honorary and it is up to the individual poet to decide whether or not to produce poetry for national occasions or Royal events"

(Posted by: M.A.Orthofer)    - permanent link -



11 May 2019 - Saturday

Oxford-Weidenfeld Translation Prize shortlist
Wales Book of the Year shortlists | CWA Daggers longlists

       Oxford-Weidenfeld Translation Prize shortlist

       They've announced the eight title shortlist for this year's Oxford-Weidenfeld Translation Prize, for which literary translations into English from European languages are eligible; no word yet at the official site, but see The Bookseller report.
       The only one of the shortlisted titles under review at the complete review is The Desert and the Drum, by Mbarek Ould Beyrouk.
       The shortlisted titles were apparently selected from over 100 titles in 22 languages.

(Posted by: M.A.Orthofer)    - permanent link -



       Wales Book of the Year shortlists

       Literature Wales has announced the shortlists for this year's Wales Book of the Year, in three categories each in English and Welsh.
       Impressively, all three of the Welsh fiction finalists were published by Y Lolfa.
       The winners will be announced 20 June.

(Posted by: M.A.Orthofer)    - permanent link -



       CWA Daggers longlists

       They've announced (warning ! dreaded pdf format !) the longlists for this year's Crime Writers Association Daggers, "regarded by the publishing world as the foremost British awards for crime-writing".
       Two Three of the titles longlisted for the CWA International Dagger are under review at the complete review: Newcomer, by Higashino Keigo, The Cold Summer, by Gianrico Carofiglio, and Weeping Waters, by Karin Brynard.
       The winners will be announced 24 October.

(Posted by: M.A.Orthofer)    - permanent link -



10 May 2019 - Friday

Austrian State Prize for European Literature
Ingeborg Bachmann Prize preview

       Austrian State Prize for European Literature

       The Österreichischer Staatspreis für Europäische Literatur, awarded since 1965, is one of the leading international author prizes (though it is limited to European authors), and does have a very impressive list of winners; they've now announced that this year's winner is Michel Houellebecq (The Elementary Particles, Submission, etc.).
       He gets to pick up the prize on 26 July.

(Posted by: M.A.Orthofer)    - permanent link -



       Ingeborg Bachmann Prize preview

       They've announced the lineup for this year's Ingeborg Bachmann Prize-competition at the 'Tage der deutschsprachigen Literatur' ('Days of German-language literature'), the 43rd time they're holding this public-reading-and-judging prize; previous winners include Ulrich Plenzdorf (1978), Wolfgang Hilbig (1989), Sibylle Lewitscharoff (1998), Terézia Mora (1999), and Lutz Seiler (2007).
       Clemens J. Setz will start things off with his lecture on 'Kayfabe and Literature'
       The competition runs 26 to 30 June.

(Posted by: M.A.Orthofer)    - permanent link -



9 May 2019 - Thursday

Goncourts | Translating Maltese literature into ... Norwegian
Karl Ove Knausgård Q & A | A Devil Comes to Town review

       Goncourts

       The winner of the prix Goncourt -- the big French novel-prize -- will only be announced in November, but they've now announced a batch of the other Goncourts:
(Posted by: M.A.Orthofer)    - permanent link -



       Translating Maltese literature into ... Norwegian

       At MaltaToday Teodor Reljic has a Q & A with Kristina Quintano about Translating Trevor: the challenging road of bringing Maltese literature to Norway.
       She notes:
The main challenges in promoting the literature from Malta in Norway in general has always been that I have to start from scratch every time. Norwegian readers or publishers don’t know a lot about Malta so I always have to start by explaining the two-language practice and the Arabic influence before I even start talking about the Maltese literary scene.
       And:
Translating swearing is almost impossible. No one in Norway would use the swear words we use in Malta. [...] Also, all religious and political references are much more present in the Maltese language than in Norwegian. It’s challenging to transform that into plausible Norwegian, but that is what makes it so interesting.

(Posted by: M.A.Orthofer)    - permanent link -



       Karl Ove Knausgård Q & A

       The latest in the always interesting Conversations with Tyler-series (yes, I did one of these too) has Tyler Cowen speak with My Struggle-author Karl Ove Knausgård on Literary Freedom.

(Posted by: M.A.Orthofer)    - permanent link -



       A Devil Comes to Town review

       The most recent addition to the complete review is my review of Paolo Maurensig's A Devil Comes to Town, just out from World Editions.

(Posted by: M.A.Orthofer)    - permanent link -



8 May 2019 - Wednesday

Wodehouse Prize | Orwell Prize longlists
Translation in the US | Deep Red review

       Wodehouse Prize

       They've announced that Reasons to be Cheerful by Nina Stibbe has won this year's Bollinger Everyman Wodehouse Prize for Comic Fiction; see, for example, the report at The Bookseller.
       Reasons to be Cheerful isn't out in the US yet, but is coming in July; see the publicity pages from Little, Brown and Viking, pre-order your copy at Amazon.com or get your copy at Amazon.co.uk.

(Posted by: M.A.Orthofer)    - permanent link -



       Orwell Prize longlists

       They've announced the longlists for this year's four Orwell Prizes, including the new Orwell Prize for Political Fiction (as well as the nicely named Prize for Exposing Britain's Social Evils).
       The shortlists will be announced later this month, and the winners will be announced 25 June.

(Posted by: M.A.Orthofer)    - permanent link -



       Translation in the US

       At Publishers Weekly Open Letter publisher Chad Post takes a look at the numbers over the (recent) years and ponders Will Translated Fiction Ever Really Break Through ?

(Posted by: M.A.Orthofer)    - permanent link -



       Deep Red review

       The most recent addition to the complete review is my review of Nozawa Hisashi's Deep Red, out from Vertical a couple of years ago.

(Posted by: M.A.Orthofer)    - permanent link -



7 May 2019 - Tuesday

Premio Formentor | Internationaler Literaturpreis shortlist
Libris Literatuur Prijs | Tim Parks 'On Criticizing Translation'
Sleepless Night review

       Premio Formentor

       The (revived) Premio Formentor de las Letras has a solid list of winners since they brought it back in 2011, after a more than forty year hiatus -- including Carlos Fuentes, Juan Goytisolo, and Enrique Vila-Matas -- and they've now announced this year's winner -- the certainly very worthy Annie Ernaux; see, for example, the El País report.

(Posted by: M.A.Orthofer)    - permanent link -



       Internationaler Literaturpreis shortlist

       They've announced the six-title shortlist for this year's Internationaler Literaturpreis, honoring: "an outstanding work of contemporary international literature that has been translated into German for the first time" (and paying out €20,000 for the author and €15,000 for the translator).
       Only one of the books is a translation from the English -- Gerald Murnane's Border Districts .
       (Hélène Cixous's Mother Homer is Dead... is one of the titles also available in English -- though it a rather pricey edition; see the Edinburgh University Press publicity page, or get your copy at Amazon.com or Amazon.co.uk.)

(Posted by: M.A.Orthofer)    - permanent link -



       Libris Literatuur Prijs

       They've announced that De goede zoon, by Rob van Essen, has won this year's Libris Literatuur Prijs, one of the leading Dutch book prizes, paying out €50,000.
       See also the Dutch Foundation for Literature information page for the book, or the Atlas Contact publicity page.

(Posted by: M.A.Orthofer)    - permanent link -



       Tim Parks 'On Criticizing Translation'

       At the Asymptote weblog Allison Braden has a Q & A with Tim Parks, On Criticizing Translation.
       Among his observation/arguments:
In recent years and in Anglo-Saxon countries in particular, translation has become attached to a certain political stance. Translation is seen, in some broad sense, as morally good. Hence it has to be defended even when done badly.

(Posted by: M.A.Orthofer)    - permanent link -



       Sleepless Night review

       The most recent addition to the complete review is my review of Margriet de Moor's Sleepless Night, out ... today, from New Vessel Press (and House of Anansi Press, in Canada).

(Posted by: M.A.Orthofer)    - permanent link -



6 May 2019 - Monday

Sebald Lecture 2019 | Joseph-Breitbach-Preis

       Sebald Lecture 2019

       Emily Wilson delivered the W G Sebald Lecture 2019 -- 'Translating the Odyssey Again: Why and How' -- on 17 April, and the video is now available online.

(Posted by: M.A.Orthofer)    - permanent link -



       Joseph-Breitbach-Preis

       At €50,000 the Joseph-Breitbach-Preis is a leading German author-prize, and they've now announced that this year's prize will go to Thomas Hettche -- not yet at the official site, last I checked, but see, for example, the Boersenblatt report.
       Hettche's The Arbogast Case (see the Farrar, Straus and Giroux publicity page) and What We Are Made Of (see the Picador publicity page) have been translated into English.
       The award will be presented on 20 September.

(Posted by: M.A.Orthofer)    - permanent link -



5 May 2019 - Sunday

PEN World Voices Festival | The Closed Garden review

       PEN World Voices Festival

       The PEN World Voices Festival, with a theme of 'Open Secrets' starts tomorrow in New York, and runs through 12 May.
       A lot of interesting events, so if you're in the neighborhood, well worth checking out.

(Posted by: M.A.Orthofer)    - permanent link -



       The Closed Garden review

       The most recent addition to the complete review is my review of Julien Green's 1927 novel, The Closed Garden, re-issued under its original French title, Adrienne Mesurat.

       I like the beginning of the Publishers Weekly review:
Ah, to be young, beautiful, wealthy and living in the French countryside ... take it from Adrienne, it's hell.
       It was a big success, back in the day, both in Europe and the US -- a Book-of-the-Month Club selection, and reviewed (very favorably) by Walter Benjamin. And the Persian translation recently came out in Iran !

(Posted by: M.A.Orthofer)    - permanent link -



4 May 2019 - Saturday

Publishing in ... Brazil | Copyright (not) in .... Iran
Translating Vasily Grossman

       Publishing in ... Brazil

       At The Brazilian Report Marcelo Soares has a graph-filled look at The bleak scenario of book publishing in Brazil, as there has been a significant decrease in both the number of titles published and copies sold in recent years.

(Posted by: M.A.Orthofer)    - permanent link -



       Copyright (not) in .... Iran

       In the Tehran Times Samaneh Aboutalei reports that Lack of copyright, big obstacle for Iranian publishers of translated books.
       Iran is one of the few countries not party to international copyright regimes and even where publishers try to play by international rules, buying rights to publish in Iran, successful books often face rival unauthorized translations. American sanctions complicate matters further -- having: "put obstacles in the way of companies trying to legally collaborate with publishers overseas".

(Posted by: M.A.Orthofer)    - permanent link -



       Translating Vasily Grossman

       In Publishers Weekly Elina Alter reports on What Robert and Elizabeth Chandler Found in Translation in translating Vasily Grossman's Stalingrad, a thousand-pager forthcoming from New York Review Books in the US and Harvill Secker in the UK next month; see the NYRB publicity page, or pre-order your copy at Amazon.com or Amazon.co.uk.

(Posted by: M.A.Orthofer)    - permanent link -



3 May 2019 - Friday

EU Prize for Literature shortlists | Hold Fast Your Crown review

       EU Prize for Literature shortlists

       The EU Prizes for Literature are an odd semi-national prize, awarded each year to emerging authors from twelve or thirteen of the 'Creative Europe'-programme countries (the member states of the EU, and thirteen assorted others), rotating from year to year; this year the countries whose authors will be honored are: Austria, Finland, France, Georgia, Greece, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Lithuania, Poland, Romania, Ukraine, and the United Kingdom.
       National juries select the national winners, and they've now announced this year's shortlisted candidates.

(Posted by: M.A.Orthofer)    - permanent link -



       Hold Fast Your Crown review

       The most recent addition to the complete review is my review of Yannick Haenel's Hold Fast Your Crown, recently out from Other Press.

(Posted by: M.A.Orthofer)    - permanent link -



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